PiecebyPeace

This week’s guest writer is Natalie Frisk, Curriculum Developer at The Meeting House Church – a church for people who aren’t into church. She lives in Hamilton, Ontario and is ordained with the Brethren in Christ Canada. Natalie is married and has one amazing daughter. We invited Natalie to contribute to our Ottawa Notebook, when we heard about her amazing personal initiative. Read on….

I used to be a Just War Theorist. I’m a person of action, and so when there is a person being persecuted or unjustly injured in some way, I want to jump into action. I would have never expected that my jump to action would be as a peace advocate.

About 9 years ago, I started to go to The Meeting House Church while attending Redeemer University College in Ancaster, Ontario. The idea of church in a movie theatre felt strange, but what felt even stranger to me was the sense that after years of feeling slightly unsettled in various denominations, I was home.

Dauda Babangida, left, and Abubakar Idris are Peace Club participants at Muhammadu Abdullahi Wase Private School in Wase town, Nigeria.

Dauda Babangida, left, and Abubakar Idris are Peace Club participants at Muhammadu Abdullahi Wase Private School in Wase town, Nigeria.  MCC provides significant support to the development of Peace Clubs in several African countries.

Week by week, I experienced beautiful people, beautiful teaching, and was able to anchor myself in a beautiful home church. After a short period there, I was confronted with what would become one of my greatest hurdles: peace teaching. I couldn’t seem to wrap my mind around it, and so I took it to my home church to wrestle through. A leader in that home church kindly said, “Why don’t you just look at what Jesus said?”

Could it be so simple? I thought I had. I mean, I knew the Gospels. I knew what the Bible said. Didn’t I?

And so, I took up the challenge and all I could find over and over again was Jesus preaching enemy love. “Pray for those who persecute you.” “Love your enemies.” “If someone slaps you on the right cheek, offer the other cheek also.” They went on, and on, and on. Jesus taught peace. Jesus lived peace. Jesus was and is the Prince of Peace.

I had a choice: I could continue on in the way I had always thought about war as if fighting was “helping,” or I could follow the way of Jesus.

Jesus. I wanted to follow Jesus. I wanted to know and learn the way of peace.

Fast-forward a few years, and I found myself becoming a voice for peace; however, I started to realize that being a voice just wasn’t enough. Peace required action.

Roughly a year ago, I read an article about a five-year-old girl who decided to sell pink lemonade for peace. It’s a fantastic piece that I’d invite you to read here. In short, this little girl had a vision to sell lemonade and donate the funds raised to peace initiatives. She raised a couple of thousand dollars, had a huge impact in her city, and was able to actively promote peace. Did I mention she was just five?

This story stuck with me and I wasn’t able to shake it. Maybe it was the innocence and creativity combined. Maybe it was the other-centredness of a child at such a young age. Or maybe it was because peace was such a passion of mine.

Whatever the reason, the story made me restless. It inspired me to act.

Peacebuilding among young people spreads conflict transformation skills throughout society. Mittapab ("Friendship"€) is a group of Lao young adults and teachers. They build peace in Vientiane by working with high school students, using their own curriculum. Students learn to promote relationship peace and cope with daily conflicts. Global Family support helps Mittapab teach conflict transformation to teachers and students. This photo shows a peace training among high school students.

Mittapab (“Friendship”€) is an MCC-supported peace project in Lao. It trains teachers and young adults in conflict resolution skills which they pass on to high school students in Vientiane. Students learn to promote relationship peace and cope with daily conflicts. This photo shows a peace training among high school students.

And so, one morning, I woke up and announced to my husband that I’d like to raise $30,000 for peace initiatives with MCC by my 30th birthday. He said it was crazy – but that was exactly why I needed to do it! I called my initiative PeacebyPiece.

I realized that peace is something we talk about, aspire to, and hope for, but we very rarely take action for it. I needed to push myself (and encourage others!) to put my money where my mouth was when it came to putting peace into action.

My birthday has come and gone. I raised about $5,000 for peace, but have readjusted my goal to continue to raise funds during this year. I have sold Poinsettias for Peace, Popcorn for Peace, t-shirts, and even threw a fundraiser birthday party for peace for myself. For me, failing was still succeeding. I’ve had to opportunity to share in churches, in youth groups, and will continue to call others to creative active peace making wherever I go. The funds that have been raised to this point will make an impact.

My hope is to continue to raise the conversation of peace in our every day lives, peace around the world, and be able to help support some of the incredible work that Mennonite Central Committee is doing to build peace in our world now and for the future.

 

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