Sharing our gifts: advocacy in the name of Christ

Guest writer for this week is Allan Reesor-McDowell, Community Engagement Coordinator for MCC Ontario. Allan has worked for MCC in Canada and internationally for about ten years. He recently completed a Master of Science degree in Development Studies at the University of London UK.

Feeding the hungry

The story of Jesus feeding the five thousand in Mark (6:30-44) offers fascinating insights on the theme of sharing our God-given gifts. The disciples are clearly overwhelmed at what it will take to feed the crowds and want to send the crowds away. Instead, Jesus poses an important question: How many loaves and fishes to do you have?

 Since these kids' parents started participating in agriculture and nutrition trainings, they been growing (and eating!) a more diverse range of vegetables, including carrots, in Ratemate, Okhaldhunga. Since 2010, MCC Nepal, with funding from CFGB, has been working with local Nepali organizations in Okhaldhunga District to improve agriculture and livestock production, improve nutrition, and strengthen farmers' groups.

Since these Nepalese kids’ parents started participating in agriculture and nutrition trainings, they been growing (and eating!) a more diverse range of vegetables, including carrots, in Ratemate, Okhaldhunga.  Since 2010, MCC Nepal, with funding from CFGB, has been working with local Nepali organizations in Okhaldhunga District to improve agriculture and livestock production, improve nutrition, and strengthen farmers’ groups.

With the “loaves and fishes” its supporters offer, Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) responds to basic needs around the world. For instance, MCC supports a project in Nepal enabling primary schools to provide nutritious snacks to over 400 children in early childhood classes – children who might not otherwise eat during the school day. This is an important and effective response to poverty, and one way to love our global neighbours. MCC supporters are very familiar with this aspect of our work.[1]

But beyond sharing literal “loaves and fishes,” I think Jesus is encouraging a shift in mindset that has the disciples focus not on what is lacking (which leads to being overwhelmed at tasks ahead), but on what they have. In other words, Jesus is asking, What do you have?

What I find so special about this question is the underlying assumption that we always have resources around us. There are gifts that can be shared in any given situation. This assumption has broad implications about sharing gifts that go beyond feeding hungry people.

What do you have?

MCC responds to basics needs, yes. But MCC doesn’t stop there. MCC also advocates for social and policy change that might, for example, reduce the number of children around the world who go hungry. Big changes are needed to reduce poverty and injustice around the world, and social change is seldom achieved without advocacy.[2] So, loving our neighbour means providing a meal to hungry children. And loving our neighbour also means we “shed light on an unjust situation, or tak[e] nonviolent steps to transform injustice to justice.”[3] Advocacy is a key tool in MCC’s ministry of relief, development and peace in the name of Christ.

IMG_6659Yet a recent research project on support for MCC’s advocacy work revealed that there is “limited awareness of MCC’s advocacy work or how it undergirds and supports other MCC work.”[4] My guess is that this indicates a lack of involvement in advocacy activities from a significant portion of MCC’s constituency. Perhaps, like the disciples, this has something to do with being overwhelmed by the challenges ahead? Or perhaps it relates to a lack of confidence that our voice and contribution will really make a difference?

Advocacy in the name of Christ

But if we take anything from the story of Jesus feeding the five thousand, it is this: Don’t be overwhelmed! Look instead at what “we” have – as individuals, as congregations, as a broader church, and as part of coalitions who seek similar social and policy change that will contribute to peace and justice. With God’s help, we can and do make a difference. Each person, created in God’s image, has gifts to share. And one important avenue to share our gifts is through supporting advocacy efforts. We have “a role in promoting the reign of God while holding governments accountable to their God-given task to provide a just, peaceful and sustainable order for society.”[5]

[1] Mennonite Central Committee Canada, Canadian Advocacy Research Project Final Report, Winnipeg, MB., 2014, page 9.

[2] Steven Teles and Mark Schmitt, “The Elusive Craft of Evaluating Advocacy,” Stanford Social Innovation Review, Summer 2011, page 39.

[3] Mennonite Central Committee, “Loving our neighbor through witness to government” [brochure]

[4] Mennonite Central Committee Canada, Canadian Advocacy Research Project Final Report, Winnipeg, MB., 2014, page 9.

[5] Mennonite Central Committee, “Loving our neighbor through witness to government” [brochure]

4 thoughts on “Sharing our gifts: advocacy in the name of Christ

  1. A very good reminder to keep ourselves abreast of the advocacy component of MCC’s work and a call to support these efforts to bring about justice and change. Thanks Allan.

    • Thanks for the feedback, Dalton. And thanks for your many contributions in working for peace and justice. [p.s. I received a note from Suchana this afternoon, as well. She mentioned you forwarded this post to a few people. Thanks for sharing!]

  2. I read this quotation today:
    “God doesn’t need your extraordinary talent. He needs your fearless obedience.” Erwin McManus

    And so we offer what we have (great or small).

    Thanks for this Allan.

    • Thanks for the quote, Stephen. Fearless obedience is in line with the concept of being prophetic. And being prophetic appears to be a key component of advocacy, at least at the early stages of struggles for justice. Thanks for sharing!

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